LB section six

May 1, 2018

There are over 56,000 new cases of thyroid cancer diagnosed cancer each year in the U.S., and 12 million people right now have a thyroid disease or cancer and are completely unaware. And every year, 2,000 people will die because they didn’t know.

This leaves anxiety to be had, questions to be answered. Am I one of those 12 million? Where do I go, what is the first step to knowing, or possibly treating, a disease I didn’t even know I had?

If you think you are continually experiencing symptoms of hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, or any form of thyroid cancer, the first step is to always speak with your doctor. You should also inform your doctor of any family history, this goes for any disease or disorder.

If you have a family history, even if you have never experienced symptoms before, it is important to get blood work regularly and have your doctor test your thyroid levels. It is not commonly done in blood tests, but you can ask your doctor to do so.

If you do find that you have a thyroid disease, it is important to stay optimistic and focused through this journey. The news may be frightening and upsetting, but a calm and focused outlook will help you more than a panicked outlook does.

If you see someone you know experiencing any symptoms, talk to them about it. It’s easy to blame these symptoms on other aspects of life, but in many cases something more severe may lie under the surface, and it is important to bring it to their attention so they can seek proper treatment.

One student, who has chosen to stay anonymous, states that their sister has been affected by both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism.

“We just tried to take it in stride, go with it, and figure out how to deal with it,” she said

When going through these tough times, it is important to have a good support system in your life. The right people will help you find the light in the dark journey, and help you maintain a calm and focused outlook.

A good outlet for those seeking advice or people who have gone through similar struggles, Websites, such as Thyroid Cancer Survivors’ Association help local support groups and chat forums of people who are fighting or have survived this disease.

Finally, it is important to not lose hope. The journey will not be easy no matter what condition you may have, but knowing is half the battle, and anyone is strong enough to get through the rest.

For more information, please visit any of these websites:
http://www.thyca.org/sg/

Dr.Zaidi – America’s Leading Unconventional Endocrinologist


https://www.cancer.gov/types/thyroid
https://www.endocrineweb.com/conditions/thyroid/all
https://www.cancer.org/

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